The primary job of every leader is to keep the vision front and center in the organization. But that’s easier said than done. The book I just recently read, Be Mean About the Vision, by Shawn Lovejoy, identifies ways churches and organizations can drift from their vision, and identifies ways to either keep that from happening or get back on track. This is a book every leader can benefit from. Here’s a synopsis….


One definition of the word mean is “to have an intended purpose.” Being “mean” about the vision is being intentional about the vision. If we’re not intentional about the vision, we will lose it. We will drift off course. We will end up going somewhere we don’t want to go and becoming something we don’t want to become. 

CHAPTER TWO: It All Starts with Vision

None of us actually invents the vision for our lives, churches, and organizations. We were created by God for His purposes, so we discover God’s vision for our lives through our relationship with Him. I believe we will make a mess of things if we skip our personal wrestling-with-God process to discover our unique mission. 

CHAPTER THREE: Vision and Success

I truly believe that any organization can be successful if three key points are in place: if the vision is clear, if it is compelling, and if there is consistency over time. We don’t need to have a revolutionary idea that no one has ever thought of to be successful. We don’t have to be the best communicator in the world. We don’t have to do it like someone else is doing it. 

CHAPTER FOUR: A Vision We’re Willing to Die For

If your vision ever has a chance of becoming a reality, it must be such a deep-seated conviction that you’re willing to do anything to see it through. You must believe the vision is even bigger than you. We need to know that at some point in the future, we will be asked to risk everything for the vision. 

CHAPTER FIVE: Keeping the Vision Alive in Me

Because I am a leader, everyone is depending on me to maintain the passion and energy that vision requires. They’re counting on me to regularly run to the source, fill up my vision bucket time and again and then challenge everyone else to keep doing the same. If I grow weary, everyone else will. Before we can cast the vision to others, we have to begin with ourselves. 

CHAPTER SIX: Keeping the Vision Alive in Others

Our next leadership task is to pass it on so that others can make it their own. We believe God has spoken to us—and the way we communicate should demonstrate that. People are more often persuaded by passion than logic. What our listeners need from us is a white-hot passion for the vision. 

CHAPTER SEVEN: Identifying a Vision Hijacker

Every organization begins 100 percent unified around the vision. Over time, new people come on board who don’t understand what the organization really stands for. They certainly have different ideas about where it should go. Vision hitchhikers often become vision hijackers. If we don’t wake up and seize the wheel, we’re going to end up miles away from our destination. 

CHAPTER EIGHT: Keeping the Vision from Being Hijacked

We need to be slow in placing people into positions of power. I evaluate new team members by four equally critical components—character, capacity, chemistry, and calling. A leader’s primary job is to protect the vision. The sooner we confront any perceived vision drift the better. We don’t need to wait until we’re positive that there’s a problem to confront it. 

CHAPTER NINE: When It’s Not Working Out

We know it’s time to release someone when a team member refuses to change problematic behavior, or if they’ve reached their maximum capacity and moving them to another role doesn’t resolve the tension. When personal chemistry is not there, we owe it to the team member to acknowledge it. Once the decision is made to release a team member, act quickly. 

CHAPTER TEN: Getting Back on Track

What do we do when we look up and realize the vision has drifted? We should seek to get key players on board first. Everyone needs to know why change is good for them. Remembering why we do what we do always creates passion. Go public only after your leaders are 100 percent behind the proposed changes. 

CHAPTER ELEVEN: Pleasing the Right Audience

Leaders must understand that people usually buy into us before they buy into the vision. But there’s a difference between pleasing people and being a people pleaser. At the end of the day, we must choose to please God first and foremost. He has called us and placed us where we are for a reason. He is ultimately the only audience we must please at all costs. 

CHAPTER TWELVE: Releasing the Vision to a New Leader

Leadership succession is one of the great challenges for churches. Founding and long-tenured pastors have historically not done so well. The most common approach to succession: A wonderful pastor moves to another church or retires, the church takes a long time to find a replacement, and the successor doesn’t last long. 

CONCLUSION: Don’t Be Afraid

We simply cannot lead if we’re making leadership decisions based on what will make everyone happy, or on who might leave or not leave, give or not give. So go out there and be mean about the vision! 

If you’re are interested in reading the book in its entirety? You can purchase is here: http://amzn.to/2fzMmlh